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M
Main Topic

Have you ever noticed that in nearly every internet website or interant website, the space allocated for different subjects is unequal?

Almost all website managers (regardless of the type of website) knows either methodologically or intuitively that the subject they want to put "stage center" should be distinguished from the other subjects and should be placed "in the first place everyone will see". The ideal placing, the required size and style of highlighting/writing are all subject to the website manager's interpretation. Therefore websites are substantially different from one another, yet everyone agrees that the main subject should be highlighted. The windowlet template in the knowledge website/portal which is supposed to represent the central subject is referred to as a main topic. Why? Quite simply, because its structure enables the marketing and marketing we wish to achieve. The source of the windowlet predates the age of knowledge websites and portals in webzines. Every webzine always contains a cover story or central piece. This is our windowlet; this is the main topic.

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Matters of size (yes, size matters!)

The world is rapidly evolving technologically: the market is flooded with new cellular devices, iPads, tablets, etc. Before we're even finished paying for our new device, we find ourselves paying for a newer one. The big companies are competing for our hearts, trying to sell us the best "surfing experience". Surfing experiences are obviously affected by the device itself (user interface, size, display, etc.) and equally important: the content. This is where we, Knowledge Management (KM) personnel, come into the picture.


Making content accessible has become complicated due to a variety of devices and the subsequent need to adapt the design to various resolutions. Try surfing a regular website from your cellular phone: The display is illegible.
This isn't simply a cellular problem; multiple computer screens generate a similar problem. More than once, I've built a website or content page that on my screen looked just fine. Yet on the clients' screen the display seemed

distorted, the scrolling was extremely long or included smaller scrolling in windows. Does this sound familiar?

 

What can we do?
In the recent past (as in the present), web designers would design several versions according to the various existing screens. Programmers were expected to program various websites, one for each resolution. The quick turnover forces us to think differently and work differently. The most recent development involves Responsive Web Design.
Responsive design is website design that alters according to the browser size and resolution of the device used. Various elements in the website adapt themselves to the size and location automatically, while others are omitted. Rather than creating different designs for each device/browser, we must relate to them all as different facets of one surfing experience and generate "flexible" websites than can adapt themselves to the media through which they are being viewed.

 

How is Responsive Design created?
Responsive Design requires 3 main components:
1. An outline based on a flexible grid
2. A use of flexible media and pictures
3. A use of media queries from CSS code
Simply put, web designers need to think more openly when planning the website and programmers need to program differently.

 

Current state in organizations
Typically, the web substantially precedes organizations. Organizations invest in responsive designs and cellular apps when dealing with their internet websites, yet do not regarding their intra-organizational sites (to my knowledge). The resolution problems therefore remain unsolved regarding these organizational sites. This is probable due to a combination of several components, including the following three:


Firstly, the responsive design requires greater investment of time on behalf of designers. Organizations aren't always interested in this investment, especially if during the setup process the organization doesn’t hold multiple screens or doesn't have the intention/ability to display the website in cellular settings.

 

Secondly, some might be still unaware or practically unknowledgeable of the matter and designers don't always offer this service when designing intra-organizational websites.

 

Thirdly, this is a shift in the way programmers and HR works, which is an extremely complex issue.
In conclusion, it’s important to be aware of the multiple resolution problems that exist in organization and consider them when planning websites. It's best to invest in responsive design from the start to save the resources invested in adaptations and amends usually required in later stages.

 

Metadata

Metadata is a tool through which we define and describe documents, data and other data information items. Metatorial is a term which refers to activities related to metadata and its structure. There are a number of different categories that comprise the metadata:

  • Navigation Metadata- serves us when constructing the hierarchal navigation and direct access. We define the orientation through the information with these Metadata.
  • Management Metadata- technical information including the author's name, the date of the item's creation, update date etc. The Metadata through which we manage the actions performed on the item.
  • Content type Metadata- taxonomic Metadata such as subject, client, product, provider, project type, structure type, etc. Together with navigation Metadata, this category defines the item.
  • Inner structure Metadata- includes the item's title, a description and the body of the item. This is used for defining uniform templates for well-defined content items.

The management Metadata and structure Metadata are general and identical in every organization while the navigation Metadata and content Metadata must be constructed and tailored for each organization and unit according to its needs and organizational/ professional taxonomy.

 

                                                                                        -Based on the “Content Management Bible” by Bob Boiko.

Micro-blogging and Twitter

Much has been written about blogs and personal pages. Many of us already belong to the "peeking" and sharing culture and expose ourselves on at least one social network on the internet. For example, if you've uploaded the pictures from your last trip to your Facebook wall- I can now get to know you, as you can me, my friends and colleagues and their friends and colleagues as well.

Nevertheless, this doesn't seem enough for networking addicts, and so a new phenomenon had slipped into our internet lives: micro-blogging. If the classic blog blurs the distinction between the private and the public, the micro-blog takes us one step further. The micro blog is an almost immediate journal, a live report on anything one wants, basically answering the simple question: "what are you doing now?" It can be updated from an internet website, from instant messaging software or a cellular phone and it reports immediately to all friends on the internet, mobile phone and other devices.

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