2Know Magazine: Sharing KM Knowledge
2Know: Sharing KM Knowledge
September 2018 - Magazine No. 228
September 2018 - Magazine No. 228
Edition:

Organizations are constantly reaching decisions to upgrade the organizational Knowledge Management system.

The system upgrade's natural context is replacing the current system with another: a newer one, featuring more advanced abilities that is commonly used by other organizations. This system must be purchased, money must be invested, and time must be spent in characterizing and selecting a supplier; also, results aren't immediate.

Yet replacing the system isn't necessarily the key to success.

The quantum leap may stem from the current system, either by implementing a new ability, reorganizing the information or by embedding it.

When an organization already owns an organizational Knowledge Management system, it doesn't have to feature the most advanced abilities and does not have to be the most expensive system. It doesn't even have to be the system commonly used by most organizations. Its success might depend on optimally answering the current/rising needs.

When I work with KM projects in organizations, I usually tell the customer that their job is to present the need while mine is to suggest a solution.

An in-depth understanding of the current system and optimal comprehension of the need the organization faces can lead to creative solutions using the current system. Even if the system doesn't provide a precise solution, we now have an available solution and an optimal one; we can present the customer with two alternatives and let them choose between them.

The solution is still not compatible with the need? We can pay and develop a solution for the current system. Make sure the development answers future needs as well.

Always study the solution well so that you can exploit it for future needs.

 

What are the advantages of using the current system?

  • Purchase costs? None.
  • Investing time in learning how to operate the system? only newcomers require training. Workers that have been using the system won't need to invest time in learning how to operate a new system.
  • Implementing among edge-users? The users do not need to adapt to the new system. They do, however, require an embedding plan for unfamiliar applications or abilities.
  • Require a solution for a need not optimally answered by the current system? invest time and development costs only on this solution.

 

Hereby are two ideas for utilizing an existing resource:

Want to upgrade the organizational portal? Prepare the "most urgent needs" list, either most common or those that solving will be considered revolutionary in the organization. Meet with the supplier and review how to best answer said needs. A minimal investment of time and money might lead to the desired solution.

Want to set up a knowledge management service center system? Review whether the organizational portal can serve as an apt alternative for a knowledge directory, even if it is not regarded as one. You might find yourselves surprised.

And if you've decided to nevertheless purchase a new tool?

  • Try to cooperate with other units in the organization- you might be able to characterize a shared needs list that can be answered via one tool. You might gain a substantial reduction of costs and greater commitment on behalf of your supplier.
  • Choose a system that can display data from other systems in the organization. Even if you don't require this ability at first, you might require it in the future. It is important you know the meaning of this development in the future.
  • Consider the future- what can you or other units in the organization benefit from this system? can it serve as another KM solution in the organization?

In conclusion, the innovation presented here (which might be obvious to some) is the innovation of using existing resources for new solutions.

Innovation deals with development of new knowledge using creative methods.

Knowledge Management is somewhat wider: it deals both with new and existing knowledge, putting a major effort on reuse of existing knowledge, positioning it and making it more efficient.

 This is a meaningful dilemma: when should we choose innovation and when should we prefer Knowledge reuse or other more conservative methods of knowledge development based on the existing knowledge?

The default should be Knowledge reuse and conservative development, as these are cheaper processes that require few resources since they are based on existing material.

When should we nevertheless prefer innovation?

  1. A crisis can serve as a chance to change. When faced with no choices at all, it is best to change a direction and perform new moves.
  2. When competition act differently and are showing interest in a new solution/direction. Organizations should then not remain content with their current success in order to avoid being "left behind" and lose customers.
  3. When new technology is developed- this is a chance to review whether it is worthwhile to perform things differently. For example, can using Web 2.0 applications generate quality/better solutions featuring other functions than those currently available?
  4. When it's been a while since your "last change" and you realize you can't rely on your current tools and methods. This is a case in which the product/service's market share is still high, yet its growth rate is low, a situation that calls for innovation in order to gain competitive edge and reach a state in which we can affect market needs instead of being solely affected by them. This is the difference between a promoting organization and a reacting organization.

In conclusion, even when a client suggests a new idea, or a worker brings up a new initiative, we should consider the offer; it might be an opportunity we would hate to pass on in the future. Who knows, we just might be the pioneers of an innovative idea.

Learning lessons is an activity familiar and common among organizations. As Knowledge Management personnel we recommend it as a method of organizational learning and assist organizations in formulating a lesson learning method that suits it best. Usually, the lesson learning process ends with writing a detailed summary document, then distributing it and storing it somewhere in virtual space. However, learning lessons isn't a means in itself.

The big question is which products can be derived from it so that the knowledge it holds may allow workers to learn and improve.

Hereby are the three first components in the journey from theory to practice:

 

Lessons:

A lesson is a recommendation based on positive or negative experience from which others can learn to improve their performances in either a defined task or their ongoing work.

What defines the quality of a learned lesson? First and foremost, it must be correct and applicable. Phrasing and accessibility can make it clear and user-friendly.

Recommendations:

  1. The lesson must be phrased clearly, concisely and in a focused manner that contains the following components: context (when is it performed?), essence (what is recommended to do or avoid) and rationale (why should we do/avoid this).
  2. The lesson can be accessed intuitively and in the appropriate context. It is best to "float" it towards workers rather than wait for them to access it proactively.
  3. Applying the lesson will require workers to work correctly

An example of such a lesson:

When a team of contract workers is required to perform many critical tasks in a short time, it is recommended to procure the work for a 'fixed' rather than 'cost' pricing. Past experience shows that this pricing lead to work being performed in less time and by a more professional team.

 

Assignments:

An assignment is a distinct and defined one-time task that are assigned a monitor and defined a short run time. Assignments derived from lesson learning

Learning lessons is an activity familiar and common among organizations. As Knowledge Management personnel we recommend it as a method of organizational learning and assist organizations in formulating a lesson learning method that suits it best. Usually, the lesson learning process ends with writing a detailed summary document, then distributing it and storing it somewhere in virtual space. However, learning lessons isn't a means in itself.

The big question is which products can be derived from it so that the knowledge it holds may allow workers to learn and improve.

Hereby are the three first components in the journey from theory to practice:

 

Lessons:

A lesson is a recommendation based on positive or negative experience from which others can learn to improve their performances in either a defined task or their ongoing work.

What defines the quality of a learned lesson? First and foremost, it must be correct and applicable. Phrasing and accessibility can make it clear and user-friendly.

Recommendations:

  1. The lesson must be phrased clearly, concisely and in a focused manner that contains the following components: context (when is it performed?), essence (what is recommended to do or avoid) and rationale (why should we do/avoid this).
  2. The lesson can be accessed intuitively and in the appropriate context. It is best to "float" it towards workers rather than wait for them to access it proactively.
  3. Applying the lesson will require workers to work correctly

An example of such a lesson:

When a team of contract workers is required to perform many critical tasks in a short time, it is recommended to procure the work for a 'fixed' rather than 'cost' pricing. Past experience shows that this pricing lead to work being performed in less time and by a more professional team.

 

Assignments:

An assignment is a distinct and defined one-time task that are assigned a monitor and defined a short run time. Assignments derived from lesson learning are usually relevant to an event that occurred and requires handling its defects. These tasks mustn't remain on paper; their execution must be monitored.

An example of such a task: replacing or purchasing equipment, holding a discussion on X, delivering a tutorial, etc.

 

Change.

Change is not a specific recommendation, it is a long-term plan for a personal or organizational behavioral change. I recommend offering only one change per lesson learning process, since an organization cannot contain too many changes at once. Businesses should mainly focus on the central business activity; performing changes should remain an auxiliary tool.

An example of such a change: implementing organizational culture that follows data security principles: covering computers and shredding papers at the end of workdays.

 

These three ways help convert lessons from written documents to actions. Learning lessons should be followed by selecting the recommendations that seem most correct, applicable and profitable to the organization and actively ensure that they are appropriately handled. This will contribute to the organization's attempts to constantly improve and excel.

 

are usually relevant to an event that occurred and requires handling its defects. These tasks mustn't remain on paper; their execution must be monitored.

An example of such a task: replacing or purchasing equipment, holding a discussion on X, delivering a tutorial, etc.

 

Change.

Change is not a specific recommendation, it is a long-term plan for a personal or organizational behavioral change. I recommend offering only one change per lesson learning process, since an organization cannot contain too many changes at once. Businesses should mainly focus on the central business activity; performing changes should remain an auxiliary tool.

An example of such a change: implementing organizational culture that follows data security principles: covering computers and shredding papers at the end of workdays.

 

These three ways help convert lessons from written documents to actions. Learning lessons should be followed by selecting the recommendations that seem most correct, applicable and profitable to the organization and actively ensure that they are appropriately handled. This will contribute to the organization's attempts to constantly improve and excel.

 

Term: Rating

The term 'rating' originally refers to an evaluation of the percentage of viewers viewing a certain television show and ranking the television shows in a descending order.

Nowadays, in the ago of internet, 'rating' is used to refer to the way in which search engines rate internet pages and websites. The rating results will affect the order in which the websites and pages are displayed in search results.

 

How is it done (that's actually a good question…)

Every website owner is interested in their site to appear first, second or to at least appear on the first page of a Google search containing a word/subject related to the product/service they offer.

Many consulting companies offer to promote the website's search results potential in order to improve the website's traffic.

Search engines rate the pages they find according to an assessment of their expected relevance to the users' queries by combining query-based questions and independent queries while analyzing and assessing this page's assumed importance.

Hereby are some well-known algorithms that relate to analyzing independent queries:

  • The HITS (Hyperlink-Induced Top Search) algorithm, Created by John Kleinberg in 1997 to rate internet websites, is an algorithm examines two properties of each page: "authority" which evaluates the links to the page and "hub" which evaluates the links from the page to other pages. Thus, the algorithm attempts to evaluate the page's importance. If the links come from website homepages such as Yahoo!, Google or MSN (which are highly important websites), then the page will be rated highly.
  • PageRank is an algorithm that serves the Google search to rate websites found in their search engine's results. PageRank, named after Google founder Larry Page, is a method that evaluates the website pages importance. According to Google, " PageRank relies on the uniquely democratic nature of the Web by using its vast link structure as an indicator of an individual page’s value. In essence, Google interprets a link from page A to page B as a vote, by page A, for page B. But, Google looks at more than the sheer volume of votes, or links a page receives; it also analyzes the page that casts the vote. Votes cast by pages that are themselves "important" weigh more heavily and help to make other pages "important." 
  • TrustRank is a technique developed by scientists Zoltan and Gyeonggi, designed to allow search engines to fight spam and pages that manipulated their way to a higher ranking. Human editors scan some of the pages to identify spam websites. Since they no one can scan all internet pages and rely exclusively on this method, TrustRank considers a website credible based on its relation to credible websites.

 

In conclusion, there are many methods for rating websites for search engines. Methods are developed according to changes in the web itself.

Nowadays, some companies rate internet websites according to various criteria (for example: Alexa, SimilarWeb, etc.) by geographical segments, areas, etc. Below is a list of common websites in Israel (as of 1/17/18) according to SimilarWeb.

 

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rating

https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%9E%D7%93%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%92_(%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%99%D7%98%D7%99%D7%A0%D7%92)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranking

https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%90%D7%9C%D7%92%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%AA%D7%9D_%D7%A8%D7%A9%D7%95%D7%99%D7%95%D7%AA_%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%9B%D7%96%D7%99%D7%9D

https://www.similarweb.com/top-websites/israel

 

 

 

 

It is extremely simple to plan a detailed route nowadays, down to which restaurants or gas stations we will pass on the way.

Using maps answers one of our most basic needs: spatial orientation.

As time went by and relevant information became available (to the extent of data overload), the need to analyze the links, events and processes that take place between the objects viewed in this space in a manner that may enable merging and retrieving information according to the edge user's needs.

GIS are Geographic Information Systems that integrate hardware, software and data allowing us to examine and reveal links, patterns and trends in maps, reports and graphs.

 These systems handle the spatial aspects of the information. They illustrate spatial content visually and suggest efficient alternatives that assist the user in making decision in real-time.

They are composed of three layers:

  • A storage layer: a database
  • A logical layer: data analysis and processing
  • A display layer: the user interface

In recent years, GIS systems have become an essential and efficient tool for the general public. The fact that it isn't only used by technology personnel is an important and meaningful step towards a comprehensive cultural experience.

Integrating Geographical Information systems into organizations' core processes

Geographical Information Systems will be integrated into organizations in areas such as logistics, maintenance, monitoring, purchasing, etc. "Enriching" IT systems with map displaying and spatial analysis abilities grants them access to deeper and more extensive information. A quick look at GIS systems provides quick answers to problems and inquiries.

Many phenomena can be represented via spatial display:

  • City planning: mapping areas in the city, analyzing transport systems, changes in the composition of the population, etc.
  • Ecology: mapping and forecasting fauna and flora distribution
  • Infrastructure and communication- managing infrastructure facilities, antennae location, testing signal strength and optimizing costs
  • Hydrology: calculating rain water volume and discharge, simulating the flow in lower and upper settings
  • Social geography: demography and financial aspects, behavioral models in the reviewed space

Some examples of everyday use of these systems:

  • The urban renewal map on the Ramat Gan Municipality website (click here to view) allows watching the various centers of activity throughout the neighborhood that might interest residents
  • Geographical information offered by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (click here to view) allows viewing the location of cellular antennae, monitoring stations, beach sanitation indicators, etc.
  • Map of the Marcus Campus of Beersheba University (click here to view) enables location buildings, parking spaces, assembly halls, etc. throughout the campus

GIS technology has revolutionized the accessibility, use and sharing of geography-based information. Integrating this technology into many professional areas has substantially changed our conduct as consumers in the existing information spaces.

References

http://www.methodacloud.com/content/pages/Kit_GIS/H_Guide.htm

https://gis.huji.ac.il/

 

Written by Rom Knowledgeware
Fax 077-5020772 * Tel 077-5020771/3 * Bar Kochva 23 st., Bnei Brak Postal: 67135