Introducing: Microsoft OneNote

What is OneNote?

Let's say that you're walking to work meetings. You usually take your notebook to meetings.  Suppose said notebook is a digital, modular, flexible and ever-changing notebook with many features including sharing knowledge with other users. Well, that is OneNote.

Consider your project folder. It contains several documents, such as Word files, PowerPoint presentations and a few pictures in folders and sub-folders. Now, consider possibly binding them all in one digital document folder shared (fully or partially) with other users.

 What is it good for?

OneNote is a powerful work tool from Microsoft. The software enables collecting and organizing data in various platforms in one location. Its advantages include:

A tool familiar to users (as part of the Microsoft Office package)

Simple and user-friendly

Modular, flexible; adapts to user needs

Supports Drag & Drop

Enables organizing, tagging and sorting content

Enables adding content of various forms (pictures, video, audio, links, etc.)

Allows protecting content (by password)

Features an internal search engine

Enables sharing knowledge and remote access (including saving on "clouds")

 

 

Easily interfaces with all Microsoft Office software.

For more information, click here or Microsoft OneNote's initial tutorial screen.

 

References

Review of tutorials from the official Microsoft website and OneNote.

 

 
  Contact